Browse documentaries

Current tags: Astronomy | 12 documentaries match combinations of tags
Art (8)
Astronomy (12)
Chemistry (33)
Civilization (45)
Computers (15)
Crime (9)
Culture (4)
Economics (33)
Engineering (2)
Genetics (22)
Geology (19)
History (101)
Interviews (24)
Language (4)
Life (43)
Machinery (5)
Mathematics (13)
Medicine (17)
Music (13)
People (98)
Physics (33)
Places (56)
Politics (51)
Religion (11)
Science (63)
Sports (6)
The Future (39)
The Universe (26)
War (44)
Zoology (22)
The site of impact of an enormous comet, found in North America, has enabled scientists to model its catastrophic collision with the Earth, an event alleged to have wiped out the dinosaurs. What happened when the resulting fireball caused billions of tons of sulphuric acid to be released into the atmosphere - and could it ever happen again? Horizon reaches back in time and reconstructs how, in a brief moment, the fate of millions of species was sealed: from the new-found fossil 'horizon of death', to scientists modelling the blast itself; a million times stronger than the world's combined nuclear arsenals. Startling graphics reveal how in 30 seconds North America was scoured by a fireball. Within an hour the world was aflame. And new evidence shows that the asteroid chanced on the worst possible site on Earth to strike. It hit unique sulphate-rich rocks, vaporised them, and kicked billions of tons of sulphuric acid into the atmosphere.

Life,Science,Zoology,Astronomy,History

Crater of Death

The site of impact of an enormous comet, found in North America, has enabled scientists to model its catastrophic collision with the Earth, an event alleged to have wiped out the dinosaurs. What happened when the resulting fireball caused billions of tons of sulphuric acid to be released into the atmosphere - and could it ever happen again? Horizon reaches back in time and reconstructs how, in a brief moment, the fate of millions of species was sealed: from the new-found fossil 'horizon of death', to scientists modelling the blast itself; a million times stronger than the world's combined nuclear arsenals. Startling graphics reveal how in 30 seconds North America was scoured by a fireball. Within an hour the world was aflame. And new evidence shows that the asteroid chanced on the worst possible site on Earth to strike. It hit unique sulphate-rich rocks, vaporised them, and kicked billions of tons of sulphuric acid into the atmosphere.
December 6, 2013 - [ 1 part ]
A Brief History of Time Sound of Full Book

The Universe,Astronomy,Science,Physics

A Brief History of Time

A Brief History of Time Sound of Full Book
January 12, 2012 - [ 1 part ]
Documentary about End of the Earth, Sun and universe. The future of the planet is closely tied to that of the Sun. As a result of the steady accumulation of helium at the Sun's core, the star's total luminosity will slowly increase. The luminosity of the Sun will grow by 10% over the next 1.1 Gyr (1.1 billion years) and by 40% over the next 3.5 Gyr.Climate models indicate that the rise in radiation reaching the Earth is likely to have dire consequences, including the loss of the planet's oceans. The Earth's increasing surface temperature will accelerate the inorganic CO2 cycle, reducing its concentration to levels lethally low for plants (10 ppm for C4 photosynthesis) in approximately 500 million to 900 million years. The lack of vegetation will result in the loss of oxygen in the atmosphere, so animal life will become extinct within several million more years.After another billion years all surface water will have disappeared and the mean global temperature will reach 70 °C. The Earth is expected to be effectively habitable for about another 500 million years from that point,lthough this may be extended up to 2.3 billion years if the nitrogen is removed from the atmosphere.Even if the Sun were eternal and stable, the continued internal cooling of the Earth would result in a loss of much of its CO2 due to reduced volcanism,nd 35% of the water in the oceans would descend to the mantle due to reduced steam venting from mid-ocean ridges.The Sun, as part of its evolution, will become a red giant in about 5 Gyr. Models predict that the Sun will expand out to about 250 times its present radius, roughly 1 AU (150,000,000 km). Earth's fate is less clear. As a red giant, the Sun will lose roughly 30% of its mass, so, without tidal effects, the Earth will move to an orbit 1.7 AU (250,000,000 km) from the Sun when the star reaches it maximum radius. The planet was therefore initially expected to escape envelopment by the expanded Sun's sparse outer atmosphere, though most, if not all, remaining life would have been destroyed by the Sun's increased luminosity (peaking at about 5000 times its present level).However, a more recent simulation indicates that Earth's orbit will decay due to tidal effects and drag, causing it to enter the red giant Sun's atmosphere and be vaporized.Possible alternatives to this fate include the purposeful displacement of an asteroid from the Kuiper belt, which would repeatedly fly close enough to Earth as to enlarge its orbit, thereby preventing the overheating of its surface. The lifespan of the biosphere could thereby be extended by 5 billion years. 

Science,Life,Physics,Astronomy,The Universe

End of the Earth in Universe

Documentary about End of the Earth, Sun and universe. The future of the planet is closely tied to that of the Sun. As a result of the steady accumulation of helium at the Sun's core, the star's total luminosity will slowly increase. The luminosity of the Sun will grow by 10% over the next 1.1 Gyr (1.1 billion years) and by 40% over the next 3.5 Gyr.Climate models indicate that the rise in radiation reaching the Earth is likely to have dire consequences, including the loss of the planet's oceans. The Earth's increasing surface temperature will accelerate the inorganic CO2 cycle, reducing its concentration to levels lethally low for plants (10 ppm for C4 photosynthesis) in approximately 500 million to 900 million years. The lack of vegetation will result in the loss of oxygen in the atmosphere, so animal life will become extinct within several million more years.After another billion years all surface water will have disappeared and the mean global temperature will reach 70 °C. The Earth is expected to be effectively habitable for about another 500 million years from that point,lthough this may be extended up to 2.3 billion years if the nitrogen is removed from the atmosphere.Even if the Sun were eternal and stable, the continued internal cooling of the Earth would result in a loss of much of its CO2 due to reduced volcanism,nd 35% of the water in the oceans would descend to the mantle due to reduced steam venting from mid-ocean ridges.The Sun, as part of its evolution, will become a red giant in about 5 Gyr. Models predict that the Sun will expand out to about 250 times its present radius, roughly 1 AU (150,000,000 km). Earth's fate is less clear. As a red giant, the Sun will lose roughly 30% of its mass, so, without tidal effects, the Earth will move to an orbit 1.7 AU (250,000,000 km) from the Sun when the star reaches it maximum radius. The planet was therefore initially expected to escape envelopment by the expanded Sun's sparse outer atmosphere, though most, if not all, remaining life would have been destroyed by the Sun's increased luminosity (peaking at about 5000 times its present level).However, a more recent simulation indicates that Earth's orbit will decay due to tidal effects and drag, causing it to enter the red giant Sun's atmosphere and be vaporized.Possible alternatives to this fate include the purposeful displacement of an asteroid from the Kuiper belt, which would repeatedly fly close enough to Earth as to enlarge its orbit, thereby preventing the overheating of its surface. The lifespan of the biosphere could thereby be extended by 5 billion years.
June 13, 2011 - [ 5 parts ]
Naked Science,National Geographic Channel,narrated by Alec Baldwin

Astronomy,Science,The Universe

Journey To The Edge Of The Universe

Naked Science,National Geographic Channel,narrated by Alec Baldwin
June 1, 2011 - [ 12 parts ]
Dark matter are invisible objects that react with matter by gravitational force. Scientists believe that the dark matter is made up of exotic particles like WIMPs(Weakly Interacting Massive Particles).In physical cosmology, dark energy is an exotic form of energy that permeates all of space and tends to increase the rate of expansion of the universe.Dark energy is the most popular way to explain recent observations that the universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate. In the standard model of cosmology, dark energy currently accounts for 73% of the total mass-energy of the universe.

Astronomy,Science,Physics,The Universe

The Dark Matter & Dark Energy

Dark matter are invisible objects that react with matter by gravitational force. Scientists believe that the dark matter is made up of exotic particles like WIMPs(Weakly Interacting Massive Particles).In physical cosmology, dark energy is an exotic form of energy that permeates all of space and tends to increase the rate of expansion of the universe.Dark energy is the most popular way to explain recent observations that the universe appears to be expanding at an accelerating rate. In the standard model of cosmology, dark energy currently accounts for 73% of the total mass-energy of the universe.
May 21, 2011 - [ 5 parts ]
Membrane Theory - Parallel Universes

Astronomy,Physics,Science,The Universe,The Future,Mathematics,Chemistry

M Theory

Membrane Theory - Parallel Universes
March 22, 2011 - [ 6 parts ]
Michio Kaku talked about his life, career, and his work. He responded to telephones calls and electronic communications. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and co-founder of the string field theory, a branch of the string theory. He has taught at the City College of New York for 25 years and currently holds the school's Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics.

Medicine,The Universe,The Future,Chemistry,Science,Physics,Mathematics,Astronomy

Michio Kaku Interview

Michio Kaku talked about his life, career, and his work. He responded to telephones calls and electronic communications. Michio Kaku is a theoretical physicist and co-founder of the string field theory, a branch of the string theory. He has taught at the City College of New York for 25 years and currently holds the school's Henry Semat Chair and Professorship in theoretical physics.
March 16, 2011 - [ 12 parts ]
String theory how it came into play in the realm of physics and meaning.

Science,The Future,Chemistry,Physics,Mathematics,Astronomy,The Universe

String theory

String theory how it came into play in the realm of physics and meaning.
November 18, 2010 - [ 11 parts ]
We've always structured our lives based on an unchanging past and a predictable and ordered future. But atomic and cosmic discoveries have changed all that. What is time itself? And will it ever end? 

People,Mathematics,Physics,The Future,Astronomy,Places,Science,Chemistry,The Universe

Time - BBC - 4: Cosmic Time

We've always structured our lives based on an unchanging past and a predictable and ordered future. But atomic and cosmic discoveries have changed all that. What is time itself? And will it ever end?
November 12, 2010 - [ 6 parts ]
We hold a unique knowledge of time, realising that it stretches deep into the past, and will continue into the future. How does this affect our sense of who we are?

The Universe,Physics,People,Mathematics,Places,The Future,Astronomy,Science,Chemistry

Time - BBC - 3: Earthtime

We hold a unique knowledge of time, realising that it stretches deep into the past, and will continue into the future. How does this affect our sense of who we are?
November 12, 2010 - [ 6 parts ]